Sureshot is Named

Shortly after meeting Durbar in the woods, Prince Rothan names him Sureshot….

 

            Back in Harmon the next day Rothan was busy drinking and telling anyone who would listen about the man he met in the forest during his hunting outing.  Rothan was a very popular man in Harmon.  Not only because he was the heir to the seat there and also in line for the throne of Dirka, but simply because he was a likeable person.  He had a good sense of humor, enjoyed the company of others and was also a kind man.  He may have been a bit flamboyant and maybe a little over confident but he was a prince.  It came with the territory.  A crowd of people was gathered around his table at the Lone Pine Inn.  His guards flanked him. Several flasks were scattered about Rothan, and his face was flushed from the ale he had already consumed.

            “It was amazing people.  I have never seen anything like it,” Rothan said as he related the meeting to several townspeople.  “He shot the cap right off Jeshker’s head with his bow.  I though he had killed him until I saw his hat on the ground behind him.”  The people listened with interest as the young prince related the story.

            “Then I told him to shoot the purse out of Fron’s hand from about… I’d say one hundred yards.  And you know what?  He did it.  I was stunned.  I had never seen anyone shoot like that.”  Rothan’s guards grumbled as the intoxicated prince made Durbar out to be a great hero of sorts.

            “Who was this man?” one of the listeners asked, “What was his name?”

            Rothan thought for a minute trying to recall the man’s name.  He had a bewildered look on his face.  Then he answered, “You know, I don’t know.  I forgot to ask him.  But the way he shoots a bow he should be called ‘Sureshot.’ Ha ha! Yes, that is what I will call him.  Although he is coming here before spring.”

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About Phil

Just a man with a lot of stories, poems and things to talk about in his mind. Thanks for reading.
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